Sunday, December 18, 2011

Please Join Us for our Christmas Services!

We hope that you will join us to celebrate 
the birth of Jesus in our lives! 
Everyone is welcome!


Friday, November 11, 2011

Call of Duty?


As I write this the echoes of the Last Post and Reveillé linger in the air.  It is Remembrance Day and my thoughts move from the reverence of so many commemorations I have participated in on this day to a different reality.  We have named wars for a very long time and you probably know many of those names; the Hundred Years War, the War of the Roses, the War of 1812, the Boer War, the War to End All Wars, and so on.  Behind the names of the great wars (I mean in size and not quality) lie events of human tragedy that defy imagination, as do the costs which are beyond all comprehension.
However, even as we know this week as a time to mark solemn commemoration we may have missed another “marking.” 
This week one of the greatest moments in our culture passed and was marked by great numbers of people – but probably not you, or me.  This last week the entertainment world saw the passing of a milestone in sales of one of their products.  Line ups of the estimated 1.5 million people who wanted to buy the product stretched for city blocks in cities like Toronto, Peterborough and Pembroke. 
The product to which I am referring is known by most of the millions of people who bought it as “COD MW3.”  What the acronym stands for is “Call of Duty, Modern Warfare 3.”  It is a video game which sells for less than $100.00 in this country and which has a world wide audience. 
 Why talk about a video game on Remembrance Day?
 Because as much as we do our best to commemorate the lives lost in wars in this country and in many others around the world; as much as we tell ourselves, and pray, that war will somehow be defeated so that no young men and women will again have to give up their lives “for the cost of freedom,” we continue to catechize young people, far younger than are permitted to die in wars, in the practice and praise of war.
I have not played this version of COD but I have played other such video games.  I have seen how the most vicious and heinous acts of brutality are celebrated in a game system which glorifies violence with all the immediacy and visceral skill that contemporary digital and high definition games can muster.  It is overwhelming and very impressive. 
It is also at cross purposes to what this day embraces and marks – November 11th, Remembrance Day.  On this day we pray for peace, lament the reality of war, remember those who fought and died in too many wars, and console those who have lost loved ones.  At the same time record sales of a war based violent video game continue today to climb to what industry insiders predict could be as many as one million copies a day this week.
The disconnect between what is happening today in places such as our Deep River Town Hall, and the Cenotaph in Ottawa (and almost all such similar places around our country) and what people who have the day off are also doing in their living rooms and on computer screens around this same country could not be any greater. 
It is that disconnect which I lament today.
On the one hand hundreds of thousands will pause and remember our fallen women and men in past wars; and on the other today’s youth (and many adults) will “enjoy” themselves by playing a game which glorifies the wars we seem to want to eradicate as we remember on this day. 
I believe that we, as Christians, must not be afraid to name such incongruities.  That on a day such as this we should remember that war, as monstrous as we liken it to be, is still celebrated by our culture in ways that at first seem harmless but are, in my opinion, extremely powerful and influential.  We, as Christians, cannot let the disconnection between lamenting the cost and consequences of war on the one hand, and our complicity in war’s propaganda by not naming and criticizing the commercial glorification of war on the other, continue. 
I am not advocating an attack on the freedom people enjoy that allows them to buy such video games. 
What I am advocating is the fact that we, as a Christian community, can raise our voices together and name such incongruities in our culture, and perhaps in our church, and prayerfully end them.  We can indeed build a place where our prayers for peace this week will find their enlivening in recognizing that the love affair that our culture has with violence and war must not go unchallenged.  Perhaps more importantly, our own complicity in silence to what our culture celebrates must not continue.  Our “Call of Duty” as Christians must be to reject such things as acceptable, or merely as “games,” and name them for what they are: the exaltation of a culture of violence and the incipient training of a generation of young people in the values and practices of that same culture.
To do no less is to mark this week of Remembrance with a lack of integrity which dishonors those whom we profess to remember.  Christianity’s “Call of Duty” is to be aware of what surrounds us in our culture and to be willing to name its power over us. At the same time to raise our voice in refusal to accept such things as merely a matter of course or a cause for celebration.
We are in the early stages of the engagement of our plans to make our church accessible.  “Building to Grow the Church” should not just be about bricks and mortar; it must also be about building to grow a church where God’s voice is accessible to all and calls out to a world addicted to violence and war with a different voice.  The voice of a man whom we believe, among other things, lived and died and paid a great sacrifice to end our penchant towards violence as a means to solve our serious problems – be they geo-political conflict, internal national conflicts, or even the apparent triviality of being entertained by graphically interactive violence and death.  We have the gift of building a place where we can learn to catechize each other against all forms of such things and offer that gift to others whom I believe are thirsty for it and in real need of it.
Perhaps building such a place would truly honor those whom we must remember with integrity today; not just once a year on Remembrance Day but with each passing day we live in peace, God’s peace.
Peace,
François

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Theology "ON TAP" Now On Tuesday Evening!

Theology "ON TAP" moves to a new day this evening.  We are meeting on Tuesdays from now on because of a scheduling conflict in the church.

What will not change is the nature of our discussions.  While the name of our evening's gathering alludes to two important aspects of our meetings (God and...) the scope of our discussions is not limited by either.  I hope that we will engage as many of our collective concerns as we can.

Just as a pertinent example, what does "Occupy Wall Street, or Occupy Ottawa, or Occupy Vancouver" have in common with Deep River?  The beauty of our time together is that what we talk about is entirely dependent on what we wish to talk about.  If the discussion wanes we can move on and if it waxes we can take it up again the next time.

So, come and join us each first and third Tuesdays of the month at 7:00 p.m. at The Bear's Den and engage in sharing what's on your mind.  My experience is that our collective sharing always sheds light on both the matter at hand and in our hearts and minds.

Peace,

François"

Monday, October 3, 2011

Audio Recordings of Sunday Homilies Now On This Website!

During the past week we have added functionality to our website. You now will be able to hear audio recordings of the Sunday Homily by clicking the link on the right hand side of the page. Many people have asked over the past year for copies of my Sunday Homily. By providing an audio version on our website, you are able to listen to it as many times as you like. If you are away from us for a Sunday, you may also "tune in" and be with us through the audio recording.

Over the past two Sunday mornings our congregation embarked on an exciting seven-week journey. Two weeks ago I began a seven week series of sermons in our worship services which will hopefully help us further engage the gift of the Christian faith. This series is called “A Guide to What Matters Most to Christians.”  In the weeks to come I will continue to explore what “moderate” Christianity holds as both unnecessary and necessary for us to hold fast to in our rapidly changing times.

For example, I will examine some of the things we do not need to hold on to as we call ourselves followers of Jesus: We do not need to believe that “good” Christians do not doubt.  Or, that it is OK for Christians to be judgmental and obnoxious about it at the same time.  But that will only be a short part of the series.  What is far more important is the wonderful system of belief centered on Jesus Christ we Christians have to share with each other and the world; that we have greatly promising answers to some of this life’s most challenging questions and profound difficulties. 
During the series I will look at some of the hardest questions we all have to face, such as, “What matters most in this life of ours?   Where is God?  Why is there suffering? And is there hope?”  There will be other questions and ideas as well but I hope you get the gist of things here. 
My desire is for us, as we begin our church year, to help clarify what it is we have to offer each other and our neighbours as a Christian Church.  I see this as a wonderful opportunity to remind ourselves of just who we are as Jesus’ followers in the Anglican Tradition.  And, I hope, to share that in an accessible manner with others who are just as thirsty as we are for the kind of helpful answers that can support us as we face life’s toughest questions.
You have a part in this. 
You can invite family members, friends, neighbors, and co-workers to visit our church during the seven week series.  Share with them what you love about your faith and St. Barnabas and tell them we are doing something special that you think will be of interest above and beyond our “business as usual” Sundays.  To that end the services will be modified somewhat to accommodate those who may be new to church, with an emphasis on making them feel at home.
To help clarify things here is a sample of each Sunday’s topic:
            Week1: (Don’t!) Gimme That Ol’-time Religion 
         Week 2: Jesus’ Priority: What Matters Most?  (Jesus!)
            (the audio of these first two homilies are on our website  
                  under the Audio Homilies Tab on the left)
            Week 3: Jesus’ Grace: Am I Accepted?
         Week 4: Jesus’ Work: Where is God?
         Week 5: Jesus’ Example: What Brings Fulfillment?
         Week 6: Jesus’ Death: What About Suffering?
         Week 7: Jesus’ Resurrection: Is There Hope for Us?
I am excited about continuing this series, our worship services, and what we will offer to others.  I look forward to this special time together.
Please contact me if you have any questions.
 It’s a privilege and joy to be a part of this!
 In Christ’s love and service,
 François

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Our New Homily Series Has Begun!!!

This past Sunday morning our congregation embarked on an exciting seven-week journey. I began a seven week series of sermons in our worship services which will hopefully help us further engage the gift of the Christian faith.  This series is called “A Guide to What Matters Most to Christians.”  I will explore what “moderate” Christianity holds as both unnecessary and necessary for us to hold fast to in our rapidly changing times.
For example, I will examine some of the things we do not need to hold on to as we call ourselves followers of Jesus: We do not need to believe that “good” Christians do not doubt.  Or, that it is OK for Christians to be judgmental and obnoxious about it at the same time.  But that will only be a short part of the series.  What is far more important is the wonderful system of belief centered on Jesus Christ we Christians have to share with each other and the world; that we have greatly promising answers to some of this life’s most challenging questions and profound difficulties. 
During the series I will look at some of the hardest questions we all have to face, such as, “What matters most in this life of ours?   Where is God?  Why is there suffering? And is there hope?”  There will be other questions and ideas as well but I hope you get the gist of things here.
My desire is for us, as we begin our church year, to help clarify what it is we have to offer each other and our neighbours as a Christian Church.  I see this as a wonderful opportunity to remind ourselves of just who we are as Jesus’ followers in the Anglican Tradition.  And, I hope, to share that in an accessible manner with others who are just as thirsty as we are for the kind of helpful answers that can support us as we face life’s toughest questions.
You have a part in this. 
You can invite family members, friends, neighbors, and co-workers to visit our church during the seven week series.  Share with them what you love about your faith and St. Barnabas and tell them we are doing something special that you think will be of interest above and beyond our “business as usual” Sundays.  To that end the services will be modified somewhat to accommodate those who may be new to church, with an emphasis on making them feel at home.
To help clarify things here is a sample of each Sunday’s topic:
            Week1: (Don’t!) Gimme That Ol’-time Religion (the audio of this homily is on our website                     under the Audio Homilies Tab on the left)
            Week 2: Jesus’ Priority: What Matters Most?  (Jesus!)
            Week 3: Jesus’ Grace: Am I Accepted?
            Week 4: Jesus’ Work: Where is God?
            Week 5: Jesus’ Example: What Brings Fulfillment?
            Week 6: Jesus’ Death: What About Suffering?
            Week 7: Jesus’ Resurrection: Is There Hope for Us?
I am excited about continuing this series, our worship services, and what we will offer to others.  I look forward to this special time together.
Please contact me if you have any questions.
 It’s a privilege and joy to be a part of this!
 In Christ’s love and service,
 François

Friday, September 16, 2011

Our New Homily Series Has Begun!!!


This morning our congregation embarked on an exciting seven-week journey. This morning I began a seven week series of sermons in our worship services which will hopefully help us further engage the gift of the Christian faith.  This series is called “A Guide to What Matters Most to Christians.”  I will explore what “moderate” Christianity holds as both unnecessary and necessary for us to hold fast to in our rapidly changing times.
For example, I will examine some of the things we do not need to hold on to as we call ourselves followers of Jesus: We do not need to believe that “good” Christians do not doubt.  Or, that it is OK for Christians to be judgmental and obnoxious about it at the same time.  But that will only be a short part of the series.  What is far more important is the wonderful system of belief centered on Jesus Christ we Christians have to share with each other and the world; that we have greatly promising answers to some of this life’s most challenging questions and profound difficulties. 
During the series I will look at some of the hardest questions we all have to face, such as, “What matters most in this life of ours?   Where is God?  Why is there suffering? And is there hope?”  There will be other questions and ideas as well but I hope you get the gist of things here.
My desire is for us, as we begin our church year, to help clarify what it is we have to offer each other and our neighbours as a Christian Church.  I see this as a wonderful opportunity to remind ourselves of just who we are as Jesus’ followers in the Anglican Tradition.  And, I hope, to share that in an accessible manner with others who are just as thirsty as we are for the kind of helpful answers that can support us as we face life’s toughest questions.
You have a part in this. 
You can invite family members, friends, neighbors, and co-workers to visit our church during the seven week series.  Share with them what you love about your faith and St. Barnabas and tell them we are doing something special that you think will be of interest above and beyond our “business as usual” Sundays.  To that end the services will be modified somewhat to accommodate those who may be new to church, with an emphasis on making them feel at home.
To help clarify things here is a sample of each Sunday’s topic:
            Week1: (Don’t!) Gimme That Ol’-time Religion (the audio of this homily is on our website      
                          under the Audio Homilies Tab on the left)
            Week 2: Jesus’ Priority: What Matters Most?  (Jesus!)
            Week 3: Jesus’ Grace: Am I Accepted?
            Week 4: Jesus’ Work: Where is God?
            Week 5: Jesus’ Example: What Brings Fulfillment?
            Week 6: Jesus’ Death: What About Suffering?
            Week 7: Jesus’ Resurrection: Is There Hope for Us?
I am excited about continuing this series, our worship services, and what we will offer to others.  I look forward to this special time together.
Please contact me if you have any questions.
 It’s a privilege and joy to be a part of this!
 In Christ’s love and service,
 François

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

A Guide toWhat Matters Most to Christians-New Homily Series


On Sunday, September 25th, 2011, our congregation will embark on an exciting seven-week journey. It is my intention to begin a seven week series of sermons in our worship services which will hopefully help us further engage the gift of the Christian faith.  This series is called “A Guide to What Matters Most to Christians.”  I will explore what “moderate” Christianity holds as both unnecessary and necessary for us to hold fast to in our rapidly changing times.

For example, I will examine some of the things we do not need to hold on to as we call ourselves followers of Jesus: We do not need to believe that “good” Christians do not doubt.  Or, that it is OK for Christians to be judgmental and obnoxious about it at the same time.  But that will only be a short part of the series.  What is far more important is the wonderful system of belief centered on Jesus Christ we Christians have to share with each other and the world; that we have greatly promising answers to some of this life’s most challenging questions and profound difficulties. 

During the series I will look at some of the hardest questions we all have to face, such as, “What matters most in this life of ours?   Where is God?  Why is there suffering? And is there hope?”  There will be other questions and ideas as well but I hope you get the gist of things here.

My desire is for us, as we begin our church year, to help clarify what it is we have to offer each other and our neighbours as a Christian Church.  I see this as a wonderful opportunity to remind ourselves of just who we are as Jesus’ followers in the Anglican Tradition.  And, I hope, to share that in an accessible manner with others who are just as thirsty as we are for the kind of helpful answers that can support us as we face life’s toughest questions.

You have a part in this. 

You can invite family members, friends, neighbors, and co-workers to visit our church during the seven week series.  Share with them what you love about your faith and St. Barnabas and tell them we are doing something special that you think will be of interest above and beyond our “business as usual” Sundays.  To that end the services will be modified somewhat to accommodate those who may be new to church, with an emphasis on making them feel at home.
           
To help clarify things here is a sample of each Sunday’s topic:
            Week1: (Don’t!) Gimme That Ol’-time Religion
            Week 2: Jesus’ Priority: What Matters Most?  (Jesus!)
            Week 3: Jesus’ Grace: Am I Accepted?
            Week 4: Jesus’ Work: Where is God?
            Week 5: Jesus’ Example: What Brings Fulfillment?
            Week 6: Jesus’ Death: What About Suffering?
            Week 7: Jesus’ Resurrection: Is There Hope for Us?

I am excited about this series, our worship services, and what we will offer to others.  I look forward to this special time together.

Please contact me if you have any questions.
 It’s a privilege and joy to be a part of this!
 In Christ’s love and service,
 François

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Searching for Children's Ministry Co-ordinator


St. Barnabas Anglican Church
Part-time
Children’s Ministry Coordinator/Teacher
St. Barnabas Anglican Church, Deep River, is accepting applications for the position of Coordinator/Teacher for its Children’s Ministry (Sunday School Program). The person we seek will serve as the general administrative leader of the program as well as a teacher of our church’s Children’s Ministry.

Their responsibilities will include:
·      Coordinating the work of the Children’s Ministry.
·      Answering to the Rector, take part in planning, organizing,
       enlisting and equipping teachers.
·      Taking part in the regular Sunday teaching rotation.
 Qualifications:
·      The Children’s Ministry Coordinator/Teacher should be 
        baptized and it is preferred that she or he be confirmed in the Anglican Church.
·      She or he should have experience in Christian development 
       in the Anglican Tradition, particularly with children, ages 2
       to 12.
·      Ability to work well with other teachers and under the
       direction of the Rector.
·      They must agree to the screening policy:
a.     2 written reference checks
b.     signed declaration of understanding
c.     Police Records Check
Hours and Remuneration:
The Children’s Ministry Coordinator/Teacher is expected to attend to the program from 9:45 am to 11:30 am each Sunday morning from mid-September until mid-June.  Weekly preparation for each Sunday’s session is expected to be no more than one and one half hours for a total commitment of 3.25 hours a week. Remuneration will begin at $14.50 an hour
 
To apply for this position please send a one page résumé no later than September 6th, 2011 to:


The Rev. François Trottier, Rector
St. Barnabas Anglican Church
P.O. Box 442
Deep River, ON
K0J 1P0

We thank all applicants for their interest.   
However, only those applicants called to an interview will receive a response.   
All information collected will be held in strictest confidence.

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Pledging for Accessibility

Now that St. Barnabas has overwhelmingly decided to carry on with its plans for accessibility,  I felt that the issue of pledging toward this project should be addressed.  From the outset I should outline the fact that all pledges are anonymous and that all contributions will be held in the strictest confidence.  Indeed, your contributions will be handled with the same level of confidentiality as our regular Sunday givings.  It is extremely important to both Parish Council and the Building Team that the parish's understanding be very clear on this issue.


While pledge totals will be made available for obvious reasons individual pledges and contributions will never be exposed.  The pledge totals help keep everyone abreast of just how far along we are at attaining some of the goals needed to move the project forward.  However, the meeting of those milestones is a parish wide accomplishment and will be recognized as such as we move toward our ultimate goal of completion of our accessibility project.

Whether deposited on the collection plate on Sunday mornings or dropped off in the Building Team mailbox (just outside the Parish office) handling all pledges as highly confidential is very important to me; previous experience has taught me that by seeing this undertaking as our church's collective response to present and future needs a pledge is best understood as a gift towards our collective future as a church - regardless of the pledge's source or its size.  I truly believe that "we live and move and have our being in God" and this manner of handling pledges and contributions helps reinforce and remind us of our collective reliance on, and response to God, without any untoward distractions.  If you have any questions about pledging please feel free to contact me at any of the coordinates found on our website.

Peace,

François

Thursday, June 23, 2011

INDOOR Yard Sale This Saturday!!

St. Barnabas Anglican Church will be holding an indoor Yard Sale this Saturday, June 25, from 8:00 a.m. - 12 noon in our church basement.

There will be hundreds of selections to choose from, including bicycles, dishes, glassware, collectibles, and MORE!!!! Something for everyone, so come and see what we have to offer! We have items too numerous to mention at great prices, so be advised, first come, first served!

Don't miss the largest INDOOR garage sale of the season!!

Everything priced to sell. No Early Sales!!!

Friday, June 10, 2011

Theology on Tap!!!

On the second and fourth Thursdays of the month a group of St. Barnabas' intrepid young adults, along with our Rector, meet at the Bear's Den in Deep River.  Beginning at 7:00 pm we greet one another, order suitable libations (and food) and begin a two hour conversation about just about anything to do with God, the church, faith, and what it means to follow Christ.  There are no out of bound ideas, no incorrect points of view, and no silly questions - everything is "on the table."  
 
This is a great opportunity to get together and talk about sensitive and probing faith-ethics issues.  And to do so in a safe, non-judgmental, and fun environment.  Regardless of your age and faith journey if you have questions about any aspect of faith, "spirituality," or what it means to be a Christian, this is the place to ask! 
 
The added bonus (apart from the libations and food of course) is that once the questions begin new ones follow with more ideas to take us deeper and deeper into the wealth of resources our 2000 year history of following Jesus' teachings has to offer.  Should any question be left unanswered or concept not happily addressed on the day it will be broached at the subsequent meeting.  There are no assignments, no required readings and no duties to be fulfilled; simply the opportunity to dig deeper together into faith questions and find our way to a more informed understanding of the gift of Christianity in our context.
 
If you have any concerns or questions feel free to contact François.
 

Sunday, May 29, 2011

A Moment of Discernment-from your Rector


Most of us are familiar with what has now become the more traditional acclamation following the first and second readings during the Eucharist; the reader concludes the reading with the words, “The Word of the Lord.”  With it follows the response by the congregation, “Thanks be to God.”  Of course this is true for services drawn from the Book of Alternative Services.  Many of us will remember services from the Book of Common Prayer with its own set of acclamations and responses.

As time has passed a lot churches throughout the Anglican Communion have adopted a new acclamation following the reading of scripture.  Both the readings conclude with the reader’s words, “Hear what the Spirit is saying to God’s people.”  The response from the congregation remains the same.

As someone who quite liked the first acclamation mentioned above the newest addition came as a bit of shock the first time I heard it in a service many years ago now.  However, as time passed it became clear to me that these newer words of acclamation were on to something.  Rather than merely an affirmation of the content of what was read the newer acclamation does that and includes an invitation to the listener to continue the process begun with the readings.  I like to think of it as the first step for all of us to discern what God’s word is saying and how the Holy Spirit is enlivening the word within us.

If you are growing concerned about my making a change in the way we say the readings put your mind at ease.  I am bringing the matter to your attention for another, more pressing, reason.  One which is crucial for St. Barnabas to carry in its collective heart over these next few days….

We are about to make a very important decision.  On Sunday, June 5th, following the 10:00 am service, a special meeting of Vestry will decide on the path we will follow with regards to the Building Team’s plan for accessibility.  So, it is at a moment like this that we do well to remind ourselves that discernment, that most characteristic activity of Christian faith communities, comes to the fore.  

There are many fine theological approaches to the notion of discernment but for our purposes returning to the new acclamation used following the readings is most helpful.  Regardless of whether you are against or for the Building Team’s plan what is most crucial is that we pay attention to what we feel God’s Spirit is saying to us with their proposal.  Listening to both the content of the proposal and the manner in which your heart is moved by it and by the discussions which will also be a part of the Special Vestry is paramount.  We are not only called upon to decide we must also create a space on that day where the Spirit of God can move freely and not be stifled.

By that I mean we not be distracted during our Vestry by any kind of chicanery or lack of respect for the feelings and views of our neighbours.  That we not be so hard hearted in our own views that we diminish those of our neighbours.  That we carry within us deference for others that will open the door to the breath of God moving without impediment among us. 

Our task must surely be to come up with a decision; but at the same time uphold the earnest effort to “Hear what the Spirit is saying to God’s people.”  Bearing that in mind I would like to underline that there is no right and wrong answer to the question of where your opinions lie.  There is quite simply the manner in which you are moved by the proposal’s merit, or not. 

Is this an important decision?  It certainly is, and will carry with it, regardless of our individual agreement or not, consequences for the life and ministry which St. Barnabas will embody for many years.  Of that we should all be mindful.  So, I hope you will do your best to critically examine the proposal over the next few days and let God’s Spirit move within.

But that does not mean that the process of decision making should be set aside as secondary to the actual decision itself.  My experience in such matters has taught me that any important decision in the life of a church is deeply coloured by the manner in which it is achieved, and in some cases outlives the life of the decision itself – and not always to the good!

Every one of us must come to our Special Vestry (and I pray that the whole parish will be there) carrying two prayers in our hearts: that we will make the right decision for the long term vitality and viability of our church; and that we will have done so with Christian discernment as our guide on that day.  That we will have, as the Body of Christ, presented no impediment to the free movement of God’s Holy Spirit in our midst so that we may say in all humility that, whether we agreed or not with the end result, such was the case at our Special Vestry; we did everything we could on the day to “Hear what the Spirit is saying to God’s people!”
Peace,
François

Friday, May 13, 2011

The Reverend François Trottier is Inducted!!

Bishop John, François, Cathy, David, Rob
On Tuesday, May 10th St. Barnabas celebrated with great joy the formal Induction of our priest, the Reverend François Trottier. The Rt. Reverend John Chapman, Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Ottawa presided.  He was assisted by our Diocesan  Executive Archdeacon, the Ven. David Selzer and the Ven. Rob Davis, Regional Archdeacon, while the Reverend Cathy Davis, Rector of the Parish of Petawawa, preached.





Bishop John & Fitzroy Friends

Prior to the service, François and Nancy held a private dinner at their home for family members, clergy, close friends from the Parish of Fitzroy Harbour, ON, and also friends who traveled from his past parish, St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Cambridge, Massachusetts.


 



François & St. Peter's Friends
François' sister Denise & their mother, Irma












François, Nancy & The Rev. Gary Hauch

Following the service the Parish held a public reception in the church hall. The Reception Committee outdid itself with an amazing spread of desserts, cheeses, and other wonderful delights. It was truly a night of joy and celebration for our parish!





If you have photos you would like to share with us of this event, please email them to our webmaster at this email address: stbarnabasdr@gmail.com.

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Formal Induction of The Reverend François Trottier May 10, 7:00 p.m.

The Reverend François Trottier will be inducted as Incumbent of St. Barnabas, Deep River on Tuesday, May 10, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. The Right Reverend John Chapman, Bishop of Ottawa, will celebrate and the Reverend Cathy Davis will preach. Clergy are invited to robe and the colour is white. A reception will follow the service in the parish hall. 

François and his wife Nancy have been with us since October of 2010, however this service will formally welcome them to our community. François' mother and other family members will be joining us. In addition, representatives from St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Cambridge, Massachusetts and the Parish of Fitzroy Harbour will join us to celebrate together.