Sunday, December 27, 2015

New Year's Eve Game Night!!!!!!!!

All ages are welcome to join us at St. Barnabas for board games, tabletop games, camaraderie and a time for reflection as we welcome 2016 with fellowship and prayer.

Bring treats if you wish (non-sticky, please), and any games you would like to play.  We will start at 7:00 p.m. and continue at least until midnight.

Contact Shannon Dickson at 584-4794 if you have any questions!


Happy New Year!!!!!!!!

Saturday, December 26, 2015

Christmas Begins!



PLEASE REMEMBER!!!

We have only on service on Sunday, December 27th, at 10:00 a.m.  

Everyone is welcome, please join us!

Thursday, December 24, 2015

Please join us!


Our Christmas Eve Family Service of Lessons and Carols will be at 7:00 p.m. Thursday, December 24th. This service is designed for people of all ages to come and enjoy.  We will be singing many of our well-loved carols and our children and young people will dramatize the Christmas story.  Some of our very talented young people will be singing and playing during the service.  This service will be under one hour so that families with young children may also feel free to join us.

Our 11:00 p.m. Christmas Even Candlelight Service of Holy Communion is a wonderful way to usher in Christmas Day. Each person is given their own candle to light.

As we enter the Christmas Season, we have only one service Christmas Day at 10:00 a.m. This is a great time to enjoy singing Christmas carols. Come and worship with us and welcome the newborn Christ into your hearts once again!

Sunday, December 27th, we will hold one service at 10:00 a.m.

Sunday, December 20, 2015

A Super Christmas!! Christmas Play Monday December 21st!!!!!!




Monday, December 21st, 7:00 p.m. 
St. Barnabas Anglican Church
80 Glendale Avenue, Deep River, On

DONATIONS FOR THE SYRIAN REFUGEE PROJECT, DEEP RIVER WELCOME
ACCEPTED AT THE DOOR!


Monday, November 23, 2015

An Open Letter to the People of Deep River…

As simple and as common as it is, “What can I do?” is a very powerful question.  Many people I know are asking this question of themselves due to the overwhelming humanitarian disaster created by the mass exodus of refugees from Syria in the face of crimes against humanity.  
I am very pleased to be a part of a group of people from Deep River and beyond who have chosen to respond to “What can I do?”   They have done so by committing to the sponsorship of a Syrian refugee family despite the fears stirred of late by the dreadful taking of lives in Paris.  
A growing partnership of Muslims and Christians in Deep River is well on its way to raising the required funds to bring a family from the refugee camps to our town.  Individuals and families from the Ottawa Valley Islamic Centre, Deep River Community Church, St. Barnabas Anglican Church, and several others not associated with these communities have already raised pledges exceeding $30,000 to help bring this about.  There are still many details which need to be attended to but the collective will is there as we prepare to sponsor a family under the Federal Government’s Blended Visa Office Referred Program (BVOR).  This program precedes the recently proposed Federal plan to bring 25,000 refugees from the Syrian conflict to Canada.  Our response is part of the joint partnership between sponsors and the Federal Government which requires at least a $50,000 financial commitment per family, half of which will be covered by the Federal Government – so we are well on our way.
If you would like to join us in contributing to this answer to the powerful question which many feel in the face of such global humanitarian challenges let us know.  We continue to raise funds based on the assumption that we will require more resources due to the particular needs of refugees whose lives have been traumatized by war crimes including rape, torture, and summary executions.  Beyond financial resources we also need help with such things as transportation, clothing, and the like for the family once they are here.
If you are interested in being a part of this answer to a powerful question which can help change our world for the better, you can call us at 613-584-4131 (St. Barnabas Church Office) and let us know.  Or you can email us at
office@dr-stbarnabas.ca .  Please be advised that all donations are tax deductible and that we will not accept any article of clothing or furniture, which is not in very good condition.
In the face of so much in this world which vexes our hearts this is something we can do which responds in a sharing and life giving manner.
I hope you will join us…

Peace,

François

Monday, October 19, 2015

Stewardship Sundays!!!!

For the fourth consecutive year St. Barnabas has entered its three week time of celebrating its commitment to Stewardship....It's an odd word, Stewardship, in that it does not usually come up in everyday conversation.  I recall first hearing the word in church circles decades ago and it was most definitely connect to my giving the church some of what I thought was my hard earned money!

It was not unit much later in my ministry that I heard an Anglican Bishop speak passionately of his lifelong commitment to Stewardship that my understanding of the word was given a much broader perspective.  What I remember most was his reminder to some , and something quite new to me, that at its essence Stewardship is the gift of being responsible for something which belongs to someone else.  

From a Christian perspective being a good steward means taking care of all that we are given by the source of all that is - God! Indeed our calling as God's children is to ensure that the fullness of what we receive so gratuitously from God, even in the partnership which is represented by the grace of our own gifts, is used in the manner in which it was intended; to be shared freely just as God has shared all such things freely.  This includes, of course, the unasked for gift of our life.

At its best this is not a transactional proposition, "God has done this for me so I must do that."  It is a matter of recognizing the grace filled, beneficent, and unprovoked gift of life we are given and responding to it because we cannot help ourselves; we have come to know that we are so deeply loved into life!  I hope that at least some measure of that notion is present in the way St. Barnabas embodies its Christian vocation of Stewardship and that you can see that you are an integral part of it.  

So, I ask you to prayerfully consider your commitment to our church, and in the best meaning of Stewardship take care of the gifts God has freely showered upon each of us by benevolently sharing of your gifts with others.

Peace,

François

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Blessing of the Animals 2015!





Blessing of the Animals Service 2015

As we gathered together on Sunday October 4th, the mews of cats and the yips of dogs could be heard in our sanctuary!  If you listened carefully you could almost hear the snuffling of two hedgehogs as well.

François asked the children to help bless all the animals and their caregivers at the start of our service. This little video shows photos we took of each of the animals with their caregivers. It was a wonderful blessing for all of us, even those non-animal caregivers, to share. 

Saturday, September 26, 2015

How we gather together....

As we begin our regular fall routines I would like us to “try on” a new practice here at St. Barnabas.  It is not new in many other contexts but just rather novel here.  It involves how we gather to worship on Sunday mornings at 10:00 am.
As you no doubt have experienced some of us arrive a few moments before the service and are welcomed by our Greeters and then enter the church (specifically the Nave, the pews).  Some arrive a little earlier and do much the same and take up a conversation with a friend either along the way or while seated.  Some have arrived much earlier to sit in quiet contemplation.  But in the end the overall effect is a conversational atmosphere before the service with a significant decibel level readily discernable.  There is nothing wrong with that, in, and of itself.  The difficulty that arises is that I, along with an increasing number of others, wonder if the Nave of the church is the best place for social interactions in the 10 minutes preceding the service.
Bearing that in mind it would be very interesting to experience what the church would be like in those final minutes before the service between 9:50 am and 10:00, if quiet were observed.  Quiet that I hope would facilitate peaceful preparation before worship.  This does not mean that the valuable and habitual conversations that many enjoy before the service need come to and end, they just might be better held in the Narthex; that lovely, bright and open space we have designed especially with greeting, welcoming, and sharing in mind.  When the time comes the Greeters will let you know and invite you to enter the church a few moments before we begin our worship.
 This is not something I have come up with on my own.  It also a request from some members of our church who also would like to give it a try.  Our Music Team will not rehearse before the service for the time being as a means of facilitating the effort. 
So, over the next few weeks I will remind you of this change in the way we come together and hope that you will do your best to “try it on.”  I would like the effort to extend to Advent in order that we make it a valid attempt and see what the response is like then.   There are no penalties or sanctions involved, you will not be “shushed.”   I simply see it as first foray into a possible means to further prepare and open our hearts to observe God’s presence in our midst.   Let’s see… 

Peace,  François

Sunday, August 30, 2015

As the longer days of summer begin to wane it is time to look ahead to what is in store for St. Barnabas in the coming weeks.  Our return to the regular Sunday service times of 8:00 and 10:00 am will not be an immediate one once September arrives.  There are a couple of very good reasons for the delay: The first is that Sunday, September 6th is part of Labour Day weekend which is usually our last Sunday of 10:00 am only service.  

However, this year on Sunday, September 13th we "will gather at the river," to paraphrase the 1864 hymn, "Shall We Gather at the River?" There will only be one service on that Sunday at 10:00 am.   As you may know the hymn I just mentioned has long since been associated with baptism and that is precisely what we will do!  Dominic Klukas will be baptized at 10:00 am at a baptismal service held at Lamure Beach here in Deep River.  I hope that our whole parish "will gather at the river" and join in affirming and celebrating Dominic's decision to take up the life of Christ's Body, the Church, as he is baptized in the "living waters" of the Ottawa River.  If the weather is truly awful we will retreat to the church.

The following Sunday, September 20th will finally see the return of our usual 8:00 am and 10:00 am services.  Further good news is that that Sunday will also be marked by the restart of Sunday School classes and our annual "Welcome Back BBQ" following the 10:00 am service.  As you may recall it is a feast of great BBQ fare with a large variety of salads and desserts as well...

A couple of weeks later on Sunday, October 4th we will celebrate the feast of St. Francis of Assisi with our annual Blessing of the Animals service at the 10:00 am service.  Bring your beloved pet along to be honoured and blessed as one of God's beloved creatures!  

Finally, I must not overlook that our weekly bible studies resume with the midweek study and Eucharist on September 16th at 10:00 am, and the Thursday evening study on September 17th at 7:00 pm.

This is a brief look into some of our forthcoming fall activities.  Perhaps this will brighten the prospect of returning to the days of regular schedules and less daylight as Autumn encroaches.  There is much to look forward to and I hope you too will relish the prospect of getting back into the swing of things refreshed and re-created.


Peace,

François

Saturday, June 6, 2015

Blessing of the Books & Prayer Beads for Confirmands!

On Trinity Sunday, May 31, 2015, the congregation of St. Barnabas recognized the 2015 eight Confirmation Class members and leaders as well as the 6 young people who were confirmed at Christ Church Cathedral, Ottawa, ON on Sunday May 24th, 2015 by the Right Reverend John Chapman, Bishop of Ottawa.

These photos were taken at during the 10:00 a.m. service on Trinity Sunday.  Our Rector, the Reverend François Trottier, and our wardens, Wayne Kirby and Bob Cleland, along with the youth of our parish, blessed the Bibles, Books of Alternative Services, and Anglican Prayer Beads as gifts to all members of the confirmation class on behalf of our parish.




Monday, May 25, 2015

Congratulations to our Confirmation Class!


Congratulations to the members of our St. Barnabas Confirmation Class who were confirmed at The Cathedral in Ottawa on Sunday May 24th.  We were pleased to have 6 members of this group hail from St. Barnabas, the largest number of any church represented.

The gentleman in the photo, taking the photo, is Art Baybych, retiring editor of Crostalk, our diocesan newspaper.

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Spring Fashion Show & Luncheon Huge Success!!!

Our Luncheon & Spring Fashion Show was a huge success, with over 75 people in attendance and close to 20 hand and machine sewn garments presented!! Enjoy the slide show below of this wonderful gathering!


Thank you to everyone who made this event such a huge success!


Saturday, April 4, 2015

Join Us for Easter Service!






Everyone is welcome to join us for our 

Easter Service 

Sunday
April 5th 
10:00 a.m.

Friday, April 3, 2015

Good Friday Service at 11:00 a.m.




How can we get to Easter if we do not walk through Good Friday?

Please join us for our Good Friday Service at 11:00 a.m. today.


Thursday, February 19, 2015

LENTEN DISCIPLINES



Some of you may recognize the name, Ed Lawrence.  I have been a fan of his for decades.  Every Monday noon hour he answers all kinds of gardening questions on CBC radio.  I am sure that it has happened but I have rarely heard him stumped by a horticultural question.  His love of gardening, his expertise, and his patience in dealing with people who do some of the strangest things have always impressed me.  People rightly turn to him to help get things growing again.

If one accepts that Lent is a wonderful opportunity to amend our faith lives and get things growing again in our faith lives then the notion of seeking help with our Lenten disciplines is most a propos.  We can turn to prayer, fasting and almsgiving, the traditional modalities of Lent, but we should not be limited to them. 

Every year I invite people to take up the discipline of confession as a part of the Lenten journey.  While I may not be to Lenten practices what Ed Lawrence is to gardening I am aware of just how God’s grace is operative in the Lenten discipline of confession.  Not as a tit for tat transaction where one confesses and an absolution automatically follows.  But as a second opinion on the matter of how well we are doing at making the changes we need to make in order to receive the grace filled gift of God’s new life at Easter.

Another very helpful discipline is our Lenten booklets by Henri Nouwen, available again this year.  The internet also provides a wide variety of devotional opportunities during Lent.

Whatever media we choose I think we should approach Lent as a wonderful opportunity to amend our lives and hopefully find new life; and through God’s grace and love for us, find it more abundantly!"


Peace, François

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Ash Wednesday, February 18 and Lenten Disciplines

"According to the canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, Jesus Christ spent 40 days fasting in the desert, where he endured temptation. Lent originated as a mirroring of this, fasting 40 days as preparation for Easter. Every Sunday was seen as a commemoration of the Sunday of Christ's resurrection and so as a feast day on which fasting was inappropriate. Accordingly, Christians fasted from Monday to Saturday (6 days) during 6 weeks and from Wednesday to Saturday (4 days) in the preceding week, thus making up the number of 40 days.
Ash Wednesday derives its name from the practice of blessing ashes made from palm branches blessed on the previous year's Palm Sunday, and placing them on the heads of participants to the accompaniment of the words "Repent, and believe in the Gospel" or "Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return".
(From Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ash_Wednesday)

PLEASE JOIN US for our 
Ash Wednesday Services
February 18,  11:30 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.



LENTEN DISCIPLINES

Some of you may recognize the name, Ed Lawrence.  I have been a fan of his for decades.  Every Monday noon hour he answers all kinds of gardening questions on CBC radio.  I am sure that it has happened but I have rarely heard him stumped by a horticultural question.  His love of gardening, his expertise, and his patience in dealing with people who do some of the strangest things have always impressed me.  People rightly turn to him to help get things growing again.

If one accepts that Lent is a wonderful opportunity to amend our faith lives and get things growing again in our faith lives then the notion of seeking help with our Lenten disciplines is most a propos.  We can turn to prayer, fasting and almsgiving, the traditional modalities of Lent, but we should not be limited to them. 

Every year I invite people to take up the discipline of confession as a part of the Lenten journey.  While I may not be to Lenten practices what Ed Lawrence is to gardening I am aware of just how God’s grace is operative in the Lenten discipline of confession.  Not as a tit for tat transaction where one confesses and an absolution automatically follows.  But as a second opinion on the matter of how well we are doing at making the changes we need to make in order to receive the grace filled gift of God’s new life at Easter.

Another very helpful discipline is our Lenten booklets by Henri Nouwen, available again this year.  The internet also provides a wide variety of devotional opportunities during Lent.

Whatever media we choose I think we should approach Lent as a wonderful opportunity to amend our lives and hopefully find new life; and through God’s grace and love for us, find it more abundantly!"


Peace, François

Sunday, February 8, 2015

Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper!! All are Welcome!

Please join us for a feast of pancakes, sausages, fresh fruit and refreshments on Shrove Tuesday, February17th from 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

If you wish you may leave a freewill offering which will be donated to the Northern Clergy Families Fund to help isolated clergy spouses serving in the Northern Diocese.

Saturday, January 3, 2015

Feast of the Epiphany, Sunday January 4, 2015



This Sunday, January 4, we celebrate "The Feast of the Epiphany" at St. Barnabas with ONE service, the Sung Eucharist at 10:00 a.m.

Below are some notes from Wikipedia about Epiphany that you might find interesting. Our Rector will have an interesting interpretation about one of the most important feasts of the Christian year.  Please join us!
_________________________________________________________________________

For more information, see:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphany_%28holiday%29

"Epiphany (Koine Greek: ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, "manifestation", "striking appearance")[1] or Theophany[2] (Ancient Greek (ἡ) Θεοφάνεια,Τheophaneia meaning "vision of God")[3] is a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God the Son as a human being in Jesus Christ. In Western Christianity, the feast commemorates principally (but not solely) the visit of the Magi to the Christ child, and thus Jesus' physical manifestation to the Gentiles.[4][5] Eastern Christians commemorate the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River, seen as his manifestation to the world as the Son of God.[6]
In some Western Christian denominations, especially in the past,[4][7][8] and also in the present-day Church of England,[5] the feast of the Epiphany also initiates a liturgical season of Epiphanytide.
The traditional date for the feast is January 6. However, since 1970, the celebration is held in some countries on the Sunday after January 1.Eastern Churches following the Julian Calendar observe the Theophany feast on what for most countries is January 19[9] because of the 13-day difference today between that calendar and the generally used Gregorian calendar.[10]
In the Church of England, the eve of the feast used to be celebrated as Twelfth Night. The Monday after Epiphany is known as Plough Monday.[11]
Alternative names for the feast in Greek include (τα) Θεοφάνια, Theophany as neuter plural rather than feminine singular, η Ημέρα των Φώτων, i Imera ton Foton (modern Greek pronunciation), hē hēmera tōn phōtōn (restored classic pronunciation), "The Day of the Lights", and τα Φώτα, ta Fota, "The Lights".[12]"